Education

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Vol. L No. 4 2013

This edition of the UN Chronicle looks at the social impact of education as part of the third anniversary of the establishment of the United Nations Academic Impact. The articles, written by leading experts on education, examine issues such as the importance of educating young people about the UN; higher learning institutions and global citizen education; making academic research accessible; international mobility of Brazilian students; and education as the pathway towards gender equality.

This article focuses on some crazy ideas from one new generation university in Bloemfontein, Free State Province, South Africa, called the Central University of Technology (CUT), Free State. It was the first time since the launch of UNAI that a UNAI-themed colloquium and a plenary panel discussion were held in Africa.

Through rigorous scholarship—fundamental or applied—universities are in a unique position to contribute to the search for more effective management and a resolution of such transborder problems as cybersecurity and terrorism, climate change, and cross border migration, to cite only a few.

Education for citizenship raises key questions—what is education for? What is the role of the school in developing positive attitudes amongst young people? How can controversial issues be raised in the classroom? How do we develop critical citizens?

Education for citizenship raises key questions—what is education for? What is the role of the school in developing positive attitudes amongst young people? How can controversial issues be raised in the classroom? How do we develop critical citizens?

What is the impact of a study abroad period for students on a personal and academic level? Does an exchange programme or an internationalized curriculum make graduates more employable and better able to understand the global social issues we are facing, in particular the eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals?

Is it still necessary to teach about the United Nations? Absolutely—now, perhaps more than ever. With a spiraling global population, the need to better inform and educate young people the world over about the United Nations represents an ongoing challenge that cannot go unheeded.

Not being able to read or write is a significant barrier for underprivileged women, since this can lead to their failure to make use of even the rather limited rights they may legally have (to own land or other property, or to appeal against unfair judgment and unjust treatment).